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Re: Which cardboard backing to use for custom tiles?

PostPosted: Monday March 18th, 2019 5:57am
by Kurgan
More chipboard, for fun...
MercBases_tiles.png


These are basic tiles I created for differentiating which mercenaries belong to which player on the board...

Re: Which cardboard backing to use for custom tiles?

PostPosted: Wednesday March 20th, 2019 2:07pm
by devarionarias
I recently printed out all the cards and tiles for EQ and BQ expansions and found this Georgia-Pacific Card stock to work really well. It isn't quite as thick as the original tiles, but it's firm enough not to crease or rip easily when packed away and has the added benefit of being manageable to put through your printer and print on it directly.

It isn't archival that I know of, but the price is very reasonable, so I figure if the tiles start to get damaged or whatnot I can just re-print them.

Attached are a photo of the stock I used and some tiles I printed. Please excuse the messy cut-out job as all I had to work with was a pair of scissors.

Re: Which cardboard backing to use for custom tiles?

PostPosted: Wednesday March 20th, 2019 2:11pm
by arch8ngel
For that card stock -- the tile you end up with is probably more on-par with the Kellar's Keep or Return of the Witch Lord tiles, right? (rather than anything close to resembling the core game tiles)

I'd think the core game tiles need to be printed and then glued to chip board (and dried in a book press to avoid wrinkles).

Re: Which cardboard backing to use for custom tiles?

PostPosted: Wednesday March 20th, 2019 2:17pm
by devarionarias
Yeah, pretty close to KK and RotWL. Maybe a hair thinner.

Re: Which cardboard backing to use for custom tiles?

PostPosted: Wednesday March 20th, 2019 8:38pm
by Kurgan
Not bad, what kind of printer did you use? I've done all my printing on laser printers at office depot, not the cheapest method, and colors tend to darken. Those look like they turned out really well!

Re: Which cardboard backing to use for custom tiles?

PostPosted: Monday March 25th, 2019 1:46pm
by devarionarias
My boss let me use their Cannon C5550i at work. Amazing printer!

Re: Which cardboard backing to use for custom tiles?

PostPosted: Saturday April 6th, 2019 11:47am
by Kurgan
I picked up some mod podge, and I've now seen it in action. The only problem I have is the visible brush strokes when it's done, but I suppose with a big enough brush on a small enough tile that can be minimized. Then again, most of the tiles I've printed are on high enough quality (24 pound white I believe, which has a somewhat satin finish, though it's regular printer paper) with color laser toner (and no plain white space, it's totally covered by the toner on one side) that as long as people are gentle with it, it's going to last a long time.

So color toner printed on high quality paper glue-sticked to chipboard backing = win (so far).

Re: Which cardboard backing to use for custom tiles?

PostPosted: Monday May 27th, 2019 8:26pm
by Kurgan
So I tested a little more mod podge, and while it looks and "feels" pretty good, it does have a light "tacky" feel (I just smeared a thin layer on some light card) even after a few days. I would hate to put this stuff into storage to later find it sticking and peeling off the toner printing, etc. Lamination seems cool, but it also creates a cushion of air for stuff to float around on. Maybe a "matte" finish laminate would be better? Trouble is I don't want to spend a lot on these. So far we've just tried to make sure people aren't over-handling the tiles with dirty hands, manhandling the miniatures, etc.

Re: Which cardboard backing to use for custom tiles?

PostPosted: Tuesday June 18th, 2019 8:22pm
by Kurgan
Here's a custom tile I just created...

Re: Which cardboard backing to use for custom tiles?

PostPosted: Friday June 21st, 2019 11:00am
by defttitan
devarionarias wrote:I recently printed out all the cards and tiles for EQ and BQ expansions and found this Georgia-Pacific Card stock to work really well. It isn't quite as thick as the original tiles, but it's firm enough not to crease or rip easily when packed away and has the added benefit of being manageable to put through your printer and print on it directly.

It isn't archival that I know of, but the price is very reasonable, so I figure if the tiles start to get damaged or whatnot I can just re-print them.

Attached are a photo of the stock I used and some tiles I printed. Please excuse the messy cut-out job as all I had to work with was a pair of scissors.


I approve of this Georgia-Pacific card stock for projects like this. It's inexpensive and available, and works in my home-printer without jamming. If you just want to get a decent piece on the table, this is a simple option.
I use the 110 weight (199 g / sq-m).

If I go much heavier in card stock, my printer will jam up. To get around this, I sometimes print each side of a double-sided tile, then rubber cement them together to make a double-thick item. This is a TON more work.

If you're savvy enough to figure out a digital layout tool like Scribus, you can create a same-page layout that prints both sides of your tile on the same piece of paper, perfectly aligned, so you can just fold the paper in half so that the images sandwich together. You then fold and glue the paper before you cut, which just means you cut once per double sided tiles. I think this is also a lot of work, but it would make some nice tiles for this game.