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Re: knightkrawler's gallery

PostPosted: Sunday March 29th, 2015 2:56am
by knightkrawler
As I posted this in another thread, but feel the inclination to keep this gallery as some kind of log, too, I re-post this next quote to put my painting strategy into words, for anyone to get ideas or just read how I do things, if anyone is interested in these things. It's only possible to paint my way if you have a dedicated work area, the best thing that ever happened to me since I started this hobby.

knightkrawler wrote:I always have between 4 and 8 minis on my table, all of them different.
For example, one hero, a skeleton, a goblin, an ogre, another hero, a mummy, an orc. I work on all of them at all times. When one is finished I set it aside to the varnishing batch and pick up another one to start on. I use a wet pallette with a limited color choice, premix some highlights and shadows and color swatches and keep an eye on where I can use these few colors and mixtures thereof. When the pallette has become too chaotic or dry I make the next, basically looking at the mini most likely to be finished next, choosing the next colors thereafter and using these on the other figures as well where I feel they're right.

I go back and forth not only between figures, but also between colors. That keeps things incredibly interesting and time flies by. You get the idea.

Thus, I make sure each figure is unique. I also try to implement every last one of the techniques I learn of to someday have an own style.
For me, it's not about getting things done, but becoming something of an artist in my intentions. I want my minis to look great in my eyes, painted to the best of my abilities or to a standard that I can call artistically courageous/difficult(treading new paths. The Games Workshop studio style is the only one I've never used.

Re: knightkrawler's gallery

PostPosted: Sunday March 29th, 2015 1:32pm
by Anderas
The Games Workshop style is quite simple, to start with. It is base color - wash - highlight 1 - highlight 2. No mixed colors, everything taken out of the palette they want to sell. They are just painting very cleanly so that the end result looks acceptable in spite of that "technique".

Me, I try to limit the amount of Models on the table. Normally it's not more than a dozen. Then I try to have only the same kind of model - some days ago it has been 13 Goblins. And then, I start and see where the journey goes. Sometimes the result is stunning, sometimes the result is not what i wanted; and almost always it is not what I expected. I have the Airbrush on one side, and the pens on the other side, and I mix the use of both. The Airbrus is superfast but I can't paint teeth; the pen is able to paint teeth but is slow. You see the basic system.
After, i don't have enough opportunity to paint to really come forward with my projects, so the speed really is necessary. I am lucky if i can paint once a month.

Re: knightkrawler's gallery

PostPosted: Sunday March 29th, 2015 1:48pm
by knightkrawler
Anderas wrote:The Games Workshop style is quite simple, to start with. It is base color - wash - highlight 1 - highlight 2.


For a few years now, it's not even that. They aovid a second highlight and even the first one is an edge highlight, even for their humongous maxiatures.
When you look at the new Bloodthirster painted up by their studio... it's atrocious, as clean as it is. Sterile.

Re: knightkrawler's gallery

PostPosted: Sunday March 29th, 2015 3:10pm
by Baylor_OgreBane
5 quick painting tips for all.
#1-Thin the paint down until it is about as thick as whole milk. That should be just right for painting.
#2-Colours that don't have a strong pigment like bright red or yellow can be tricky, thin them down with a corresponding ink, this will make it more vibrant.
#3-Use the side of the brush for large areas rather than the tip, it won't pool as much and is easier to catch the higher areas for highlights.
#4-Mix metallics with a similar tone mat paint to get a nice flat coverage.
#5-Keep separate water pots for normal mat colours and one for metallics to stop sparkles from appearing on your models.

hope someone might find this useful!

Re: knightkrawler's gallery

PostPosted: Sunday March 29th, 2015 7:11pm
by Redav
Anderas wrote:The Games Workshop style is quite simple, to start with. It is base color - wash - highlight 1 - highlight 2.

I realise that it's probably a bit of a mix but if the painters here had a general order (clearly undercoats come first), what would that order be? I had it in my head that a wash might be one of the last things to have gone on.

Also, how many finish their mini's with a clear coat and do you prefer a gloss or matte?

Is there any issue with using any old spray paint or does the mini material need something that won't melt it?

Re: knightkrawler's gallery

PostPosted: Sunday March 29th, 2015 10:26pm
by IvenBach
Baylor_OgreBane wrote:#5-Keep separate water pots for normal mat colours and one for metallics to stop sparkles from appearing on your models.

I wish I would have known this before I painted my goblins. It's not noticeable on the table but if you look a little closer you can see that they sparkle a bit.

Re: knightkrawler's gallery

PostPosted: Monday March 30th, 2015 2:28am
by Anderas
You can use the washes at any time you like. They are great to hide the border between two colors.
If you want the highlights to stand out, however, it is best not to cover them with dark wash colors.
I do prefer not to use a coat from the spraycan. The clear coat may be too glossy, the matte coat can actually make your mini grey in the recesses if it is only a little bit too much.

Re: knightkrawler's gallery

PostPosted: Monday March 30th, 2015 3:08am
by knightkrawler
IvenBach wrote:
Baylor_OgreBane wrote:#5-Keep separate water pots for normal mat colours and one for metallics to stop sparkles from appearing on your models.

I wish I would have known this before I painted my goblins. It's not noticeable on the table but if you look a little closer you can see that they sparkle a bit.


They are happy goblins.

Redav wrote:if the painters here had a general order (clearly undercoats come first), what would that order be? I had it in my head that a wash might be one of the last things to have gone on.


What Anderas said. But usually the wash comes in the early stages because afterwards you have to clean up the stain from the wash in places you didn't want it to be.
Myself, I don 't wash anymore. I use tiny brushes to get shades into narrow places and play around with them.

Redav wrote:Also, how many finish their mini's with a clear coat and do you prefer a gloss or matte?


Most painters don't want gloss anywhere. I'm at a point where I even try to avoid glossy paints.

Re: knightkrawler's gallery

PostPosted: Monday March 30th, 2015 5:49am
by Baylor_OgreBane
Redav wrote:
if the painters here had a general order (clearly undercoats come first), what would that order be? I had it in my head that a wash might be one of the last things to have gone on.


What Anderas said. But usually the wash comes in the early stages because afterwards you have to clean up the stain from the wash in places you didn't want it to be.
Myself, I don 't wash anymore. I use tiny brushes to get shades into narrow places and play around with them.

Redav wrote:
Also, how many finish their mini's with a clear coat and do you prefer a gloss or matte?


It really depends on how you want to paint, the style you are going for ect.
At the moment I have a very exaggerated and colourful/comic like way of painting. If I want to paint something quickly then I tend to under coat and then use an ink wash to make all the depths stand out as the shades. But That is if I use an light undercoat. I very really use black as an undercoat now, preferring brown or natural colours depending on the mini.

Would you guys like to see some of my mini's so I can show you what I mean?

Re: knightkrawler's gallery

PostPosted: Monday March 30th, 2015 8:30am
by el_flesh
uh, YA!